What is Thin Client?

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What is Thin Client

Thin client, or a thin client computer. A thin client can refer to either a software program or an actual pure hardware device that relies heavily on another computer (its server) to fulfill its computational roles. The server-side infrastructure might be virtualized and abstracted by means of protocols such as Remote Desktop Protocol, PC over IP, etc.

Thin clients are lightweight computers that depend on the server for everything that is required. They use less hard disk space, and memory and are faster. Thin clients have a video card to connect to the server, which can be wireless or wired, etc.

Another definiting of Thin Client

Thin client is a stateless, fanless desktop terminal that has no hard drive. Data and applications reside on the server, and processing takes place on the host computer rather than the desktop. While it is more secure than a fat client, it is less flexible and requires network connectivity.

Picture of a Thin Client

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More Definition on Thin Client

A thin client is a computer or other device that depends heavily on another computer (its server) to fulfill its computational roles. This is different from a conventional desktop PC, which is a computer designed to take on these roles by itself. Thin clients occur as components of a networked computing infrastructure, where many clients share their computations with a central server or server farm.

The term thin client is also used to describe software applications that use the client-server model in which the server performs all the processing and the client’s role is limited to displaying the results. This is in contrast to a thick client or fat client, which is a computer designed to take on these roles by itself. Thin clients and fat clients are also used to describe the roles of web browsers and web servers in the World Wide Web.

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